Covered bridges have long been a cherished and iconic symbol of New Hampshire’s rich history and picturesque landscapes. These unique structures, with their distinct charm and timeless appeal, have captured the imagination of locals and visitors alike.

Below, we will explore the reasons behind the covering of bridges in New Hampshire and highlight some of the most famous and popular covered bridges in the state.

Why are Covered Bridges Covered?

The covering of bridges in New Hampshire serves both functional and practical purposes. Here are a few reasons why covered bridges were built and continue to be covered:

1. Protection from the Elements
One of the primary reasons for covering bridges is to protect the wooden structural elements from the harsh New England weather. The covering shields the bridge from rain, snow, and sun exposure, preventing rapid deterioration and extending its lifespan.

2. Preservation of the Bridge Structure
The covering helps to preserve the bridge’s intricate framework and wooden trusses. By shielding the bridge from the elements, the covering minimizes the impact of moisture, which can cause rot and decay.

3. Snow Removal
In winter, New Hampshire experiences heavy snowfall, which can accumulate on bridges. The covering provides a protective layer, allowing snow to slide off more easily, reducing the weight on the bridge and preventing potential damage.

4. Enhancing Stability
The covering adds an extra layer of stability to the bridge structure. The enclosed design reduces the bridge’s vulnerability to wind, ensuring its integrity during storms and strong gusts.

Some Famous Covered Bridges in New Hampshire

New Hampshire is home to numerous covered bridges, each with its own unique history and architectural beauty. Here are some of the most famous and popular covered bridges in the state:

1. Haverhill-Bath Covered Bridge
Located in the town of Woodsville, this bridge spans the Ammonoosuc River. Built in 1829, it is one of the oldest covered bridges in New Hampshire and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

2. Flume Covered Bridge
Situated in the beautiful Franconia Notch State Park, this bridge offers stunning views of the surrounding mountains and foliage. It was constructed in 1886 and is a popular tourist attraction in the area.

3. Swift River Covered Bridge
Nestled in the scenic town of Albany, this bridge spans the Swift River. Built in 1850, it is known for its classic Paddleford truss design and is a favorite spot for photographers and nature enthusiasts.

4. Saco River Covered Bridge
Located in Conway, this picturesque bridge provides a charming crossing over the Saco River. Built in 1890, it is the only remaining covered bridge in the town and is a symbol of Conway’s rich history.

5. Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge
Straddling the Connecticut River, this bridge connects Cornish, New Hampshire, with Windsor, Vermont. Built in 1866, it is the longest wooden covered bridge in the United States and is a designated National Historic Landmark.

The covered bridges of New Hampshire are not only functional structures but also treasured landmarks that showcase our state’s history and natural beauty. These bridges have withstood the test of time and continue to captivate visitors with their rustic charm. Whether for protection from the elements or to preserve architectural heritage, the tradition of covering bridges in New Hampshire has left a lasting legacy that is cherished by all who traverse these scenic crossings.

Explore Silverstone Living

At our Silverstone Living communities, we are devoted to ensuring that our residents and at home members have endless access to the best benefits around to maximize their quality of life every single day. In addition to providing premium homes, healthcare, and wellness activities, Silverstone Living also invites our active seniors to get inspired and embrace social living through our ever-evolving activity schedules – meant to create a community of support and joy where we all work to nurture our connections with others.

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Covered bridges have long been a cherished and iconic symbol of New Hampshire’s rich history and picturesque landscapes. These unique structures, with their distinct charm and timeless appeal, have captured the imagination of locals and visitors alike.

Below, we will explore the reasons behind the covering of bridges in New Hampshire and highlight some of the most famous and popular covered bridges in the state.

Why are Covered Bridges Covered?

The covering of bridges in New Hampshire serves both functional and practical purposes. Here are a few reasons why covered bridges were built and continue to be covered:

1. Protection from the Elements
One of the primary reasons for covering bridges is to protect the wooden structural elements from the harsh New England weather. The covering shields the bridge from rain, snow, and sun exposure, preventing rapid deterioration and extending its lifespan.

2. Preservation of the Bridge Structure
The covering helps to preserve the bridge’s intricate framework and wooden trusses. By shielding the bridge from the elements, the covering minimizes the impact of moisture, which can cause rot and decay.

3. Snow Removal
In winter, New Hampshire experiences heavy snowfall, which can accumulate on bridges. The covering provides a protective layer, allowing snow to slide off more easily, reducing the weight on the bridge and preventing potential damage.

4. Enhancing Stability
The covering adds an extra layer of stability to the bridge structure. The enclosed design reduces the bridge’s vulnerability to wind, ensuring its integrity during storms and strong gusts.

Some Famous Covered Bridges in New Hampshire

New Hampshire is home to numerous covered bridges, each with its own unique history and architectural beauty. Here are some of the most famous and popular covered bridges in the state:

1. Haverhill-Bath Covered Bridge
Located in the town of Woodsville, this bridge spans the Ammonoosuc River. Built in 1829, it is one of the oldest covered bridges in New Hampshire and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

2. Flume Covered Bridge
Situated in the beautiful Franconia Notch State Park, this bridge offers stunning views of the surrounding mountains and foliage. It was constructed in 1886 and is a popular tourist attraction in the area.

3. Swift River Covered Bridge
Nestled in the scenic town of Albany, this bridge spans the Swift River. Built in 1850, it is known for its classic Paddleford truss design and is a favorite spot for photographers and nature enthusiasts.

4. Saco River Covered Bridge
Located in Conway, this picturesque bridge provides a charming crossing over the Saco River. Built in 1890, it is the only remaining covered bridge in the town and is a symbol of Conway’s rich history.

5. Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge
Straddling the Connecticut River, this bridge connects Cornish, New Hampshire, with Windsor, Vermont. Built in 1866, it is the longest wooden covered bridge in the United States and is a designated National Historic Landmark.

The covered bridges of New Hampshire are not only functional structures but also treasured landmarks that showcase our state’s history and natural beauty. These bridges have withstood the test of time and continue to captivate visitors with their rustic charm. Whether for protection from the elements or to preserve architectural heritage, the tradition of covering bridges in New Hampshire has left a lasting legacy that is cherished by all who traverse these scenic crossings.

Explore Silverstone Living

At our Silverstone Living communities, we are devoted to ensuring that our residents and at home members have endless access to the best benefits around to maximize their quality of life every single day. In addition to providing premium homes, healthcare, and wellness activities, Silverstone Living also invites our active seniors to get inspired and embrace social living through our ever-evolving activity schedules – meant to create a community of support and joy where we all work to nurture our connections with others.

Share This Story!