New Hampshire boasts a rich and diverse native plant population that plays a crucial role in supporting the state’s ecosystems. By incorporating native plants into our local landscapes, we not only enhance the beauty of our state’s natural surroundings but also contribute to the conservation of our state’s local biodiversity.

The Top 10 Native Plants to Plant in New Hampshire

1. Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana):
This evergreen tree is well-suited for New Hampshire’s climate and provides excellent habitat for birds and small mammals. Its aromatic foliage and attractive berry-like cones make it a visually appealing addition to any landscape.

2. Wild Blue Lupine (Lupinus perennis):
Known for its stunning blue flowers, the Wild Blue Lupine is a host plant for the endangered Karner blue butterfly. By planting this native perennial, you provide essential food and shelter for this rare and beautiful species.

3. Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis):
The Cardinal Flower is a striking native perennial with vibrant red flowers that attract hummingbirds and butterflies. It thrives in wetland areas and adds a splash of color to garden borders or rain gardens.

4. New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae):
This late-season bloomer is a favorite among pollinators, attracting butterflies, bees, and other beneficial insects. The New England Aster’s purple flowers add a burst of color to gardens and meadows, providing nectar for insects during the fall.

5. Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus):
As the state tree of New Hampshire, the Eastern White Pine is an iconic native evergreen that provides shade, shelter, and nesting sites for birds. Its soft needles and graceful form make it a popular choice for landscaping.

6. Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa):
Butterfly Weed is a vibrant orange perennial that serves as a host plant for monarch butterflies. By planting this native species, you support the lifecycle of monarchs and contribute to their conservation efforts.

7. Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata):
Similar to Butterfly Weed, Swamp Milkweed is a native perennial that attracts monarch butterflies. Its pink flowers and sweet fragrance make it an attractive addition to wetland gardens and rain gardens.

8. Red Maple (Acer rubrum):
The Red Maple is a native deciduous tree known for its brilliant red foliage in the fall. It adapts well to a variety of soil types and provides habitat, food, and nesting sites for a wide range of wildlife.

9. Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor):
Blue Flag Iris is a stunning native perennial with blue-violet flowers that thrive in wetland areas. Its showy blooms attract bees and butterflies, while its sword-shaped leaves add an elegant touch to pond edges and rain gardens.

10. Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta):
Black-Eyed Susan is a sun-loving native wildflower that displays bright yellow flowers with dark centers. This hardy perennial attracts bees and butterflies and is a popular choice for meadow gardens, borders, and naturalized areas.

What is the role of the Wild Blue Lupine in supporting the endangered Karner blue butterfly?

The Wild Blue Lupine (Lupinus perennis) plays a critical role in supporting the endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis). The Karner blue butterfly is dependent on the Wild Blue Lupine as its sole host plant for egg-laying and caterpillar feeding.

Here’s how the Wild Blue Lupine supports the rare and endangered Karner blue butterfly:

1. Host Plant:
The Karner blue butterfly requires the Wild Blue Lupine as its larval host plant. Female butterflies lay their eggs exclusively on the lupine leaves. Upon hatching, the caterpillars feed on the lupine foliage, which provides them with essential nutrients and sustenance for growth.

2. Food Source:
The nectar-rich flowers of the Wild Blue Lupine serve as a vital food source for adult Karner blue butterflies. The adult butterflies rely on the lupine flowers for energy, as they feed on the nectar to fuel their activities and reproductive processes.

3. Habitat Requirements:
The Karner blue butterfly is typically found in open habitats, such as pine barrens, oak savannas, and sandy areas, where the Wild Blue Lupine thrives. The lupine provides suitable habitat conditions for the butterfly’s life cycle, including egg-laying, larval development, pupation, and emergence as adults.

4. Conservation Efforts:
Due to habitat loss and fragmentation, the Wild Blue Lupine populations have declined, directly impacting the Karner blue butterfly. Planting Wild Blue Lupine in areas where the butterfly’s habitat has been diminished helps to restore and preserve suitable conditions for the species’ survival.

Just by planting some of these native plants in your New Hampshire landscape or garden beds, you can contribute to the preservation of New Hampshire’s unique biodiversity and help maintain the delicate balance of its precious ecosystems. Embrace the beauty and benefits of our state’s native plants and help play your part in conserving the natural heritage of our Granite State.

Explore Silverstone Living

At our Silverstone Living communities, we are devoted to ensuring that our residents and at home members have endless access to the best benefits around to maximize their quality of life every single day. In addition to providing premium homes, healthcare, and wellness activities, Silverstone Living also invites our active seniors to get inspired and embrace social living through our ever-evolving activity schedules – meant to create a community of support and joy where we all work to nurture our connections with others.

Share This Story!

New Hampshire boasts a rich and diverse native plant population that plays a crucial role in supporting the state’s ecosystems. By incorporating native plants into our local landscapes, we not only enhance the beauty of our state’s natural surroundings but also contribute to the conservation of our state’s local biodiversity.

The Top 10 Native Plants to Plant in New Hampshire

1. Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana):
This evergreen tree is well-suited for New Hampshire’s climate and provides excellent habitat for birds and small mammals. Its aromatic foliage and attractive berry-like cones make it a visually appealing addition to any landscape.

2. Wild Blue Lupine (Lupinus perennis):
Known for its stunning blue flowers, the Wild Blue Lupine is a host plant for the endangered Karner blue butterfly. By planting this native perennial, you provide essential food and shelter for this rare and beautiful species.

3. Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis):
The Cardinal Flower is a striking native perennial with vibrant red flowers that attract hummingbirds and butterflies. It thrives in wetland areas and adds a splash of color to garden borders or rain gardens.

4. New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae):
This late-season bloomer is a favorite among pollinators, attracting butterflies, bees, and other beneficial insects. The New England Aster’s purple flowers add a burst of color to gardens and meadows, providing nectar for insects during the fall.

5. Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus):
As the state tree of New Hampshire, the Eastern White Pine is an iconic native evergreen that provides shade, shelter, and nesting sites for birds. Its soft needles and graceful form make it a popular choice for landscaping.

6. Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa):
Butterfly Weed is a vibrant orange perennial that serves as a host plant for monarch butterflies. By planting this native species, you support the lifecycle of monarchs and contribute to their conservation efforts.

7. Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata):
Similar to Butterfly Weed, Swamp Milkweed is a native perennial that attracts monarch butterflies. Its pink flowers and sweet fragrance make it an attractive addition to wetland gardens and rain gardens.

8. Red Maple (Acer rubrum):
The Red Maple is a native deciduous tree known for its brilliant red foliage in the fall. It adapts well to a variety of soil types and provides habitat, food, and nesting sites for a wide range of wildlife.

9. Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor):
Blue Flag Iris is a stunning native perennial with blue-violet flowers that thrive in wetland areas. Its showy blooms attract bees and butterflies, while its sword-shaped leaves add an elegant touch to pond edges and rain gardens.

10. Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta):
Black-Eyed Susan is a sun-loving native wildflower that displays bright yellow flowers with dark centers. This hardy perennial attracts bees and butterflies and is a popular choice for meadow gardens, borders, and naturalized areas.

What is the role of the Wild Blue Lupine in supporting the endangered Karner blue butterfly?

The Wild Blue Lupine (Lupinus perennis) plays a critical role in supporting the endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis). The Karner blue butterfly is dependent on the Wild Blue Lupine as its sole host plant for egg-laying and caterpillar feeding.

Here’s how the Wild Blue Lupine supports the rare and endangered Karner blue butterfly:

1. Host Plant:
The Karner blue butterfly requires the Wild Blue Lupine as its larval host plant. Female butterflies lay their eggs exclusively on the lupine leaves. Upon hatching, the caterpillars feed on the lupine foliage, which provides them with essential nutrients and sustenance for growth.

2. Food Source:
The nectar-rich flowers of the Wild Blue Lupine serve as a vital food source for adult Karner blue butterflies. The adult butterflies rely on the lupine flowers for energy, as they feed on the nectar to fuel their activities and reproductive processes.

3. Habitat Requirements:
The Karner blue butterfly is typically found in open habitats, such as pine barrens, oak savannas, and sandy areas, where the Wild Blue Lupine thrives. The lupine provides suitable habitat conditions for the butterfly’s life cycle, including egg-laying, larval development, pupation, and emergence as adults.

4. Conservation Efforts:
Due to habitat loss and fragmentation, the Wild Blue Lupine populations have declined, directly impacting the Karner blue butterfly. Planting Wild Blue Lupine in areas where the butterfly’s habitat has been diminished helps to restore and preserve suitable conditions for the species’ survival.

Just by planting some of these native plants in your New Hampshire landscape or garden beds, you can contribute to the preservation of New Hampshire’s unique biodiversity and help maintain the delicate balance of its precious ecosystems. Embrace the beauty and benefits of our state’s native plants and help play your part in conserving the natural heritage of our Granite State.

Explore Silverstone Living

At our Silverstone Living communities, we are devoted to ensuring that our residents and at home members have endless access to the best benefits around to maximize their quality of life every single day. In addition to providing premium homes, healthcare, and wellness activities, Silverstone Living also invites our active seniors to get inspired and embrace social living through our ever-evolving activity schedules – meant to create a community of support and joy where we all work to nurture our connections with others.

Share This Story!