For older adults, there are many factors to consider when contemplating the decision to move or downsize. But there are a few basic questions you can ask yourself:

  • Can you stay in your current home for five, 10, or 20 more years?
  • Do you feel isolated or are your social interactions sparse?
  • Do you have a lot of equity in your home?
  • Are you struggling to manage all of your “stuff”?
  • Is your home and yard becoming challenging to maintain?
  • Do you have unused rooms in your home?
  • How is your current health—and what might that mean for your future healthcare needs?

What You Should Know About Downsizing for Retirement

Many older adults will consider downsizing from their current home and moving to a smaller space for retirement. There are plenty of reasons for this decision, which can include empty-nesters whose kids have grown and moved away, someone seeking to eliminate ongoing home maintenance or someone who finds they no longer need the space of their current home. Others decide that moving to a smaller place will help them meet their financial goals. Every situation is unique as the person making the choice to downsize.

How to Prepare to Downsize

It’s never too early to start paring down your possessions, even if you’re not sure you’re ready to downsize. This can be overwhelming, so start sooner rather than later to avoid burnout. Here are some additional tips to make preparation easier:

  • Plan early. Rushing into a relocation decision or going through your things at the last minute only adds stress. It’s also easier to adjust when you’ve had time to get used to the idea.
  • Decide on where to move. If you are moving to an apartment from a detached house, you’ll want to consider what will fit in your new place.
  • Start small. Tackle practical must-haves first, such as kitchen and bathroom items. Save the big, emotional items (art, heirlooms, photos) for later. You’ll need more time to decide what you want to do with these treasures.
  • Sort by keep, toss, and give away. Professional organizers call this “processing.” Avoid creating a “maybe” pile to help you stay on task.
  • Get rid of most duplicates other than clothing. You probably don’t need six spatulas. For clothing, set a limit. If you have 20 sweaters, pick a few favorites and let the rest go.
  • Set aside essential documents. These tend to fall into three categories: 1) proof of identity, such as birth certificates, social security cards, and passports; 2) property documents, including deeds, appraisals, titles, and registrations; and 3) wills and power of attorney documents as well as proof of disability or military service. Most other financial documents are available online; just make sure you have your account numbers and passwords.
  • Digitize whatever you can. Photos, letters, and grandkids’ artwork take up lots of space, so make digital versions. You can do it yourself or hire a company to do this for you.
  • Set goals and plan a timeline. Work backwards from the date you plan to move, considering the time you’ll need to pack everything. Be sure to include family time in your timeline for any items you are “gifting.”

Try to Stay Positive as You Downsize

While change can be challenging and downsizing for retirement can be filled with emotions, there are many ways in which this process can be enjoyable. Take your time as you declutter so you can go through your treasures and reflect on the memories associated with these items. Consider how your life will be better with the upcoming changes and who may benefit from receiving items you decide to part with.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help, whether it’s from a professional moving manager or family members. Going through belongings with friends and family can be an enjoyable process that creates new memories.

Life At Silverstone Living

With Silverstone Living, you’ll find both our Nashua campuses surrounded by natural New England beauty with the conveniences of city life. Come for a visit at any time, and you’ll find our residents working up a sweat in the fitness center, engaged in an activity club, strolling the campus walking trails, or creating toys for their grandkids in the woodworking shop. In our communities, there’s a wealth of opportunities to suit every interest. If you decide that Silverstone Living is right for you, discuss moving and relocation support with one of our Coordinators. We’re here to help make your transition to retirement as seamless as possible.

Share This Story!

For older adults, there are many factors to consider when contemplating the decision to move or downsize. But there are a few basic questions you can ask yourself:

  • Can you stay in your current home for five, 10, or 20 more years?
  • Do you feel isolated or are your social interactions sparse?
  • Do you have a lot of equity in your home?
  • Are you struggling to manage all of your “stuff”?
  • Is your home and yard becoming challenging to maintain?
  • Do you have unused rooms in your home?
  • How is your current health—and what might that mean for your future healthcare needs?

What You Should Know About Downsizing for Retirement

Many older adults will consider downsizing from their current home and moving to a smaller space for retirement. There are plenty of reasons for this decision, which can include empty-nesters whose kids have grown and moved away, someone seeking to eliminate ongoing home maintenance or someone who finds they no longer need the space of their current home. Others decide that moving to a smaller place will help them meet their financial goals. Every situation is unique as the person making the choice to downsize.

How to Prepare to Downsize

It’s never too early to start paring down your possessions, even if you’re not sure you’re ready to downsize. This can be overwhelming, so start sooner rather than later to avoid burnout. Here are some additional tips to make preparation easier:

  • Plan early. Rushing into a relocation decision or going through your things at the last minute only adds stress. It’s also easier to adjust when you’ve had time to get used to the idea.
  • Decide on where to move. If you are moving to an apartment from a detached house, you’ll want to consider what will fit in your new place.
  • Start small. Tackle practical must-haves first, such as kitchen and bathroom items. Save the big, emotional items (art, heirlooms, photos) for later. You’ll need more time to decide what you want to do with these treasures.
  • Sort by keep, toss, and give away. Professional organizers call this “processing.” Avoid creating a “maybe” pile to help you stay on task.
  • Get rid of most duplicates other than clothing. You probably don’t need six spatulas. For clothing, set a limit. If you have 20 sweaters, pick a few favorites and let the rest go.
  • Set aside essential documents. These tend to fall into three categories: 1) proof of identity, such as birth certificates, social security cards, and passports; 2) property documents, including deeds, appraisals, titles, and registrations; and 3) wills and power of attorney documents as well as proof of disability or military service. Most other financial documents are available online; just make sure you have your account numbers and passwords.
  • Digitize whatever you can. Photos, letters, and grandkids’ artwork take up lots of space, so make digital versions. You can do it yourself or hire a company to do this for you.
  • Set goals and plan a timeline. Work backwards from the date you plan to move, considering the time you’ll need to pack everything. Be sure to include family time in your timeline for any items you are “gifting.”

Try to Stay Positive as You Downsize

While change can be challenging and downsizing for retirement can be filled with emotions, there are many ways in which this process can be enjoyable. Take your time as you declutter so you can go through your treasures and reflect on the memories associated with these items. Consider how your life will be better with the upcoming changes and who may benefit from receiving items you decide to part with.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help, whether it’s from a professional moving manager or family members. Going through belongings with friends and family can be an enjoyable process that creates new memories.

Life At Silverstone Living

With Silverstone Living, you’ll find both our Nashua campuses surrounded by natural New England beauty with the conveniences of city life. Come for a visit at any time, and you’ll find our residents working up a sweat in the fitness center, engaged in an activity club, strolling the campus walking trails, or creating toys for their grandkids in the woodworking shop. In our communities, there’s a wealth of opportunities to suit every interest. If you decide that Silverstone Living is right for you, discuss moving and relocation support with one of our Coordinators. We’re here to help make your transition to retirement as seamless as possible.

Share This Story!